Scrap-urday

Do as I say, not as I do

Sound familiar? If your mom never said this to you, then I don’t believe you are really human.  This post is about following directions…-ish.  In my knitting group, we are just as likely to call a pattern a recipe, as anything else.  It may be that we are old and have problems with words.  BUT, I’m going to tell you that it is because patterns are like recipes, and you should treat them the same way. So, you should read through the entire thing.  You should gather your tools (remember all the blogs on yarn?).  And then you can start.  I do this every time (wink, wink).

Before Christmas, I have about three craft/cooking days.  Things 1 and 2, as well as O all have many gifts to give.  We started a while ago making gifts.  Thing 2 has her process down pretty pat, and then will add something in to keep things interesting.  Thing 1 and O do different things every year.  One of the things I really try to stress is to read through the whole recipe (or pattern) to make sure you know what you need to be doing and when.  This is intended to keep the comments of “oh, oops!” to a minimum.  We are all fairly terrible at this step (or we forget in between times), so it’s heard pretty frequently.  Except Thing 2’s day…Thing 2 and I swear like sailors when we screw up.

Aaah, screwing up! That’s what crafting is all about.  Screwing up, and recovering from those screw ups.  A couple weeks ago, I had to pull out 10 rows of the Waiting for Rain shawl because I *thought* I had remembered how to do one of the increases.  I mean, sure, it had been several weeks since I’d worked on the shawl, and that time was working the lace insert, but I remembered.  Except, I didn’t.  So, the lesson one would be expected to learn from this is that when one puts down a project, one should re-read the pattern *again* to re-acquaint oneself with the pattern.  I can pretty much guarantee that Future Tejedora will be having a similar moment later on.  She keeps thinking she’s smarter than she is.

This would be like when Thing 2 and I were going to make a cheesecake for my brother.  We read through the whole recipe like good little cooks–or, rather, skimmed.  In the skimming, we missed that there are something like 15 different baking steps, for different times and temperatures.  I might be exaggerating, but not by much.  Oh, oops.  Still tasted fine.

Occasionally, though, you do read the pattern/recipe, and you do follow the directions, but they still don’t make sense, or you still screw up.  There can be many reasons for this.  In the featured photo, see how there’s a section of nice and neat, and then 1/2 way along, stupid purl bumps? I followed the directions!!! I really did!!!

Well, except, I modified the pattern for two colors vs. one.  But that doesn’t count, right? Well, um, yeah, it does in this case.  So, I had made an adjustment, but I didn’t carry that adjustment throughout the project.  It’s like doubling a batch of chocolate chip cookies, but not doubling the chocolate chips.  It’s fine, I guess.  In this case, I did not take into account how my alterations would necessitate altering directions later on.  The way the lace happens in this pattern, you do short rows of stockinette lace, and then when you are done, you just knit off into the sunset.  But, that means that only 1/2 of your lace insert is knitted on that row.  When you come back, the rest of the lace insert is knitted, but now, it’s showing as purl.  So, an adjustment must be made.  I chose to leave this like it is on this first insert.  It’s rustic looking anyway, it’ll be fine.  But, in the next insert, on the way back, I switched from knit to purl on that last 1/2, so the insert is all smooth.  This *does* mean that I have a section of not quite garter for one row, but that was more acceptable to me than the 1/2 in 1/2 out visual experience that dogmatically following the rules gave me. OK fine, you purists!!! *dogmatically following the rules after I threw them out the window in the first place. I suppose one should learn to follow a change through the whole process to make sure one understands how the change could affect things in the future.  One should also live a little.

And then, Dear Reader, there are the times you follow the directions, and it just doesn’t turn out.  You re-look at the directions, and re-do it so many times, and it still doesn’t turn out. This happened to me this last year with a sweater I made for Poopie.  The cable pattern was not coming out right.  It was Elizabeth Zimmerman, so I was sure that it was me.  Clearly, I was doing something wrong.  I finally looked up the pattern elsewhere, and found there really was a typo in the Zimmerman book.  This one clearly taught me that even our heroes are just people.  And everyone needs a good editor.

Except me.  I’m going to keep telling you my typos and formatting issues are part of my charm 🙂

Monday Musings

Finally! Knitting

We will now get to which yarn I *did* choose for the shawl.  Surprisingly, it didn’t come from my yarn wall.  I don’t keep cones on the wall! That’s just crazy talk!!  It came from a yarn bin.

These are vintage wool yarns in what would probably be a 2 on the ball band in today’s times.  Because they are vintage, I have no idea anything about the provenance of them.  If I run out (I won’t), I won’t be able to get more.  I am not positive of the care and feeding of these particular yarns, so a shawl is good because most people should assume you must be very delicate in the cleaning of those. As opposed to say…a hat.

I especially like the rustic look of these yarns, and think they will add a little something to the pattern. I am a big fan of dichotomy.  It’s one of the things that I appreciate about the pattern.  It mixes the simpleness of garter with lace inserts.

I am finding with the vintage yarns there’s some old wearing and the green keeps having weak spots that I choose to break and rejoin rather than have a weak spot in my work.  I have looked carefully, and I don’t believe those spots are because of insects.  Honestly, they may be from critters chewing (I think the yarns were stored in a barn).  There is also a possibility that something in the dye is weakening the yarn.  It’s not quite a poison green…but who knows what those dyes did to the yarn??

A less…stubborn (?) person would have scrapped it all and went with some other yarn.  I am telling you, it is a pain to have to keep breaking and reattaching yarn.  As I get further along in this cone, it’s having to happen less and less.  I’m quite pleased with where I’m at with it now.

Would i do it the same knowing what I know now, though? I honestly don’t know.  I can tell you that I wouldn’t recommend it for anyone else.  Knitting isn’t supposed to be this much work.  In every project, there is some aspect that’s not my favorite.  But I don’t want it to be work.  And like Judith McKenzie kept saying in our spinning class at Madrona “Life’s too short”.

My plan for next post is to discuss a bit about following directions. Where will I land on that one?

P.S. did you notice last week’s featured picture was the yarn I chose?

Monday Musings

Back to the shawl…

You probably thought you were done having to hear about yarn structure from me.  You are almost right.  This will be the last of that for a bit…but I do have a little bit more to add.  I’ll be referring back to information from previous posts on Waiting for Rain, so check those out again if I lose you here.

Even considering gauge, as well as fiber content, there’s still the actual structure of the yarn which needs to be considered.  This is a bit of a potpourri of a topic.  Lots can affect what I’m referring to as structure.  Both gauge and fiber type have a role of course, but mostly it’s the construction style I’m talking about now.  For typical yarn, that means spinning style. However, a chenille, or a ribbon yarn would also apply to this section.

20190225_193505.jpgOne of my favorite, relatively inexpensive yarns is Lion Brand’s Homespun.  It has such beautiful colors (yes, while I can be an ass about using color as the defining consideration, I do recognize it can be *a* consideration), it feels so soft.  However, as you can see, it’s all bumply.  What this means is that it doesn’t show stitch definition.  The good of that: you can screw up a whole bunch and no one can see.  The bad of that: you can work your ass off with a beautiful stitch pattern, and no one will be able to see it.  This yarn makes wonderful garter stitch blankets.  They look super cozy (and actually are), and they are super easy to make.  If you are not one to like a concert hat, perhaps this would make a good concert knitting project for you. So, this probably won’t be my first choice for Waiting for Rain.  Unless I only did the garter in this, and found something to go with it for the lace panels.

20190225_193518.jpgThis is a singles spun yarn, which means that it is not plied like many other yarns.  It is also a warm yarn, but it is smoother than the Homespun, so it would show definition.  I made a wonderful cabled blanket out of it.  With the leftovers, I’ve made several twined knitted hats for Poopie.  Which he loves.  However, because it is only spun in one direction (rather than spun, and then plied in the opposite direction), the twisting of the knitting, and twisting of the yarns for the twining technique means that it frequently untwists enough to fall apart, so I have to do a lot of splicing in the hats.  This is why I try really, really hard not to tell people they can’t or shouldn’t do something.  Conventional wisdom is that you “shouldn’t” use singles for twined knitting.  However, these are truly Poopie’s favorite hats. They are a giant PITA to make, though.  So while I won’t say you “shouldn’t” use singles for twined knitting, I will say you “should” make sure the project/recipient is worth the extra effort you are sure to need to put in. This yarn would be a perfectly reasonable choice for the shawl, the color repeats are long enough to not be super busy and detract from the lacework.

20190225_193527.jpgThis yarn is an interesting yarn to discuss. If you look at the “core” of it, it is a laceweight. However, it has a wide halo around it.  The ball band calls it a bulky.  I think this is because you should probably use larger needles to give that halo enough freedom to “bloom”.  While this is an acrylic yarn, this type of construction is similar to what you would see with rabbit (which, yes, I know, I didn’t talk about last yarn structure post).  Yarns with this construction seem to me to most often be the super warm yarns.  They look so delicate, but they are soooooo cozy.  If you spin a more robust yarn with rabbit, you could go to the North Pole.  For me, this construction of yarn works best with a simple lace design.  I think you need the holes of the lace to let the halo really shine, but that halo will make it difficult to really see the lace.  If I’m going to be working charts and tearing out rows, I want the casual observer to *know* I busted my ass to do that, and I want them to be totally jealous of my skills.  Fuzzy yarn just doesn’t do that.  However, it makes a super easy lace chart look like you *did* do all that hard work.  Better than having everyone ooh and aah over a complicated pattern is to have everyone ooh and aah over something super easy.  I’m a big proponent of making my yarn work harder than me.  You may think that’s lazy.  I choose to say it’s smart.  Tomayto/Tomahto.

 

 

Monday Musings

Final Madrona

Another Madrona has been completed.  Sadly, it is the last one.  Happily, a new event will take it’s place.  Same bat time, same bat channel.  Different name, and different people running it.

This year I took a dye class, tablet weaving, spinning, and knitted lace.  All three of my teachers are superstars in their field, so I left Madrona on a high note.  The dye class I ended up in wasn’t a practicum class.  I gave that one up for the greater good.  So, I don’t have any pictures from dyeing.  However, my tablet weaving was a huge success!!! I love my space invaders…and their creepy eyes.  20190216_154338.jpgMy favorite John story from that day was one of the ladies had warped her loom funky.  I didn’t see/hear exactly what she did. But, that meant her piece wasn’t doing what she wanted it to do.  John went over to her, and figured out it was the warp, and not her weaving.  He said something to the effect of he didn’t want her to feel bad about her weaving, she was doing great.  She did need to feel bad about her warping, though.  Keep in mind, she comes to many of his classes, and he develops wonderful rapport with all of his students.  So, in the moment, we all laughed (she included).  The warp was fixed, and she carried on.  Auntie Pam bought me a loom, and John signed it for me.

20190217_113901.jpgSpinning with Judith is  always a joy.  She had me putting random things in with my fiber, which is how I ended up with this lichen yarn.  She’s just so matter of fact about spinning, I love her so much.  There’s never anything that we shouldn’t try.  She tells us what the potential pitfalls may be, but never says “don’t do that”.  Granted, it’s spinning, not anything that’s going to blow up.  The worst thing that will happen is the yarn will fall apart.  Oh well.  I did see these totally awesome spinning wheels that are in little pseudo briefcases…The Device. Seriously, that’s what it’s called.  I really need one.  Poopie’s eyes just got really big when I showed him what they look like.  I’m working on justifying it.  I just can’t quite yet.

And, finally, Franklin’s class.  He had me too busy to take pictures.  Auntie Pam took bunches.  And, honestly, his classes are technique, so we were futzing on swatches.  Not very photogenic.  But the information from Franklin!  The most important take away from his class was after a few inches, put the work down and conduct a “frank assessment” of the work to make sure it is what you want.  If it’s not, take it out, and fix it.  Friend L apparently had the same grandmother give her this advice, based on the number of times she restarts things.  It is often hard for me to just pull out a bunch of work.  I will do a lot of contortions to make something work that really shouldn’t.

The trip home was much less eventful than the trip up was…which was good.  Remember how I said on Thursday that some times, I’m all about the destination? That was yesterday.  Madrona always takes it out of me.  I was tired, and just wanted to be home.  Thankfully, the gods that oversee Madrona allowed for that to happen.  Please enjoy this tablet woven police box.  It is, unfortunately, not how I got home.

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While I really enjoy my time at Madrona, and all the stimulation and all the wonderful people, I am always so eager to come home.  Which is awesome–to have a home I’m grateful to come home to.

I’ve missed writing, and I’m working on trying to get scheduling worked out to where I can more consistently write.  For now, though, I’m signing off.

This Must Be Thursday

Madrona prequel

It is that time of year again, where red abounds in the stores.  Chocolate is ubiquitous.  The weather of the PNW is…unpredictable…shall we say? More importantly, though, Madrona is here!!!!  Sadly, this is the last year for Madrona.  However, there will be another festival to take it’s place for next year.  But, that is a concern for future me.

Let’s talk about current me.  More accurately, recent past me (?).  Yesterday was my travel day.  I got a call from Barb saying that Amtrak called her, and there were issues with the train, so we could wait until we were supposed to be in Tacoma to get our originally scheduled train, or they could bus us up to PDX, and we could get a different train to Tacoma.

This was frustrating to me because I love the train–not because of going from point A to point B; rather for the experience of the train.  If I wanted to ride the bus, I would have bought a bus ticket.  Oh well, needs must.  We made adjustments, and had a bus ride and a train ride, and a transfer.  Those of you who follow my Facebook or Instagram (latejedoracrafts on either one) saw my post of knitting on the bus.  Plan B.

Rather than talk about planning, though, lets talk about journey vs. destination.  Sometimes (particularly at these events), you may be asked if you are a process knitter (crafter), or a product knitter (crafter).  This is the crafter’s version of “are you an introvert or an extrovert”.  While there are a lot of people who can answer A or B, I’m not one of them.  I used to think I was B (to both questions).  I have since learned that I am more nuanced than that.  Dear Reader, please note how I spun being a pain in the tuchus into something snooty.  Please also feel free to steal that phrasing.

There are definitely times I just want to get somewhere…usually it’s that I just want to be home.  But just as frequently (I think more frequently now that I am older), the journey is a treat as well.  I think Barb was more frustrated than I about the change in plans.  Yesterday, it was probably helpful I knew where we were going, I was familiar with the process, and I knew we weren’t missing anything by the change in plans.

Similarly, with crafting, sometimes the process is just as enjoyable (or not) as the end product.  But, I need to have the right environment to enjoy the specific process.  Which is why I have so many projects in process at any given time.  My concert hats are wonderful at concerts.  Outside of those times, though? So boring, and I don’t have the patience for them, so I have other projects to fit that process.  Similarly, more complicated projects would not have an enjoyable process at some of the venues.

Pam is with me again.  Today, she is off for on Ikat weaving class.  This class is a “shortcut” method.  The traditional Ikat, as she explains it sounds terrible like you have to be *really* process oriented.  It involves weaving, painting, unweaving, and then reweaving.  This sounds like a lot of work for not enough payoff for me.  So…I am clearly not completely process oriented.  I’ll leave Ikat in her capable hands.

When people ask me what I’m weaving  or spinning, though, I do get frustrated that my answers of cloth and yarn respectively are not sufficient. Many people seem to feel like I have to have a grand plan for what I’m doing.  Again, people who know me outside of crafting can be more easily forgiven for assuming I do have a grand plan.  However, these are strangers.  Why is cloth or yarn not sufficient for them? Granted, I will eventually do something with the cloth or yarn, I just don’t know what yet.  Usually, “something” is code for sending it on it’s way to someone else.  But, if I never ended up with cloth or yarn, I wouldn’t likely engage in these activities. Weaving constantly with no payoff? I mean, it’s not a rock I have to push up a hill over and over, but it’s not far off.

So, we have 600 words to answer the question of destination or journey.  The answer by the way is it depends–and I’m OK with that.  I think the combination is also part of what made me OK with yesterday’s travel snafu’s.  On the one hand, I got to my destination sooner (destination).  On the other, I got to experience something different than the usual for the travel day (journey).

OK, I have to pick up the ladies now.  In the meantime, please enjoy the picture of the finished project from the bus yesterday (it was started before, I’m not that good).  Also note that the featured photo is the door art I was welcomed with.  (Still loving Penny Lane)

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This Must Be Thursday

What are you made of?

Last week, I talked about the gauge of yarn for a pattern.  This week, let’s talk about what the yarn is actually made of.  There are lots of different factors in this.  There are subsets to my subsets.  I want to be super clear, Dear Reader, this is literally the barest of factors.  My goal here is not to get you to the point where you think you know something.  Rather, I want you to get to the point where you realize you know nothing, and likely never will.  I know, I know, that sounds terrifying….but, it doesn’t have to be.

Yesterday was Halloween.  We dress up as something else, we try to scare ourselves and others, all in good fun.  Today is Dia de los Muertos.  In Mexico, this is the day when we honor our antecedents.  I think people try to put these two days together on the same continuum.  However, I disagree with that practice.  Halloween is about confronting our fears.  It’s about making fun of what’s scary.  Which is great!  However, the Mexican culture doesn’t seem to find the same things scary.  While a skeleton is typically terrifying for an Anglo person, it’s a canvas for a Mexican person.

Broken-Column-Frida-Kahlo
Broken Column

My words don’t do this distinction justice.  I encourage you to read some magical realism.  Or, here…this is a Frida Kahlo self portrait.  If you read a bit about her life, you’ll find it was horrible.  This portrait shows the constant pain that she lived with.  It also shows, however, the beauty she was able to make with that pain.  I don’t think I could do that.

 

Shocking no one, I have digressed greatly.  I intended to point out that not knowing doesn’t have to be scary. We have been taught that the unknown is scary.  What if, instead, we had been taught that the unknown was an adventure? What if we took these experiences and learned from them, and moved forward, and put forth our lessons to learn new things?

Lets talk about fiber content really briefly with a spirit of learning and adventure.  We’ll hopefully learn just enough to whet our appetite for more.  Waiting For Rain calls for a cashmerino.  So let’s start there…right after I rant about these dumb mash-up names…like labradoodle.  These aren’t even portmanteaux!  They sound ridiculous.  I know, it’s a living language, and I’m just being old–but c’mon!!!

This particular blend has wool, cashmere, and manufactured fibers.

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Look at all that fiber!!

Wool: There are literally entire books written about the specifics of different wools. I have been told that The Field Guide to Fleece: 100 Sheep Breeds & How to Use Their Fibers is a good place to start. Let that sink in.  100 breeds.  A place to start. So, you see why this will not be at all exhaustive?  As a rule, wool tends to be springy, and have a good memory.  This means that it will be easier on your hands while knitting.  It will tend not to “sag” or “grow”.  Wool is generally warmer, so not often good for warmer climes (either the knitting of, or the gifting to).  Wool, unless it is treated, is not generally machine washable…so it will need special handling for cleaning.  DO NOT think that wool is scratchy and gross.  The reason those fulled wool blankets feel gross is because they have little ends sticking out all over the place, what you knit will not have that construction, so your hand knit item won’t be gross.  Merino is actually one of the “softer” wools.

 

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I spared you creepy eyes, and gave you fabulous hair!

Cashmere: Cashmere actually comes from goats rather than sheep.  Isn’t that cool? whatever you do, don’t think about their creepy eyes staring at you when you are cuddling that cashmere sweater.  For reasons I’ll likely go into in a spinning conversation, cashmere is super soft and can be spun much thinner easier than “wool”.  However, it is stupid expensive, so you will almost always find it mixed with something else.

 

Manufactured fibers: This is as helpful as “artificial colors and flavors” in the ingredients list of food.  Manufactured fibers could have structural purpose, they could provide elasticity.  They could provide washable-ness.  They could just be filler.  IDK.

Other fibers you might see commercially include, but are not limited to:

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Life cycle of the Silk Moth

Silk: this is the cocoon of the silk moth.  The fiber has a beautiful sheen.  It can also be spun incredibly thin.  These two factors make the yarn/fiber “slick” rather than fuzzy.  It is incredibly breathable and rot resistant.  For this reason, items made of silk do better in tropical climes.  Silk is technically a protein fiber, however, it doesn’t always act the same way as other protein fibers.  It is a thing all its own.

 

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What are you looking at?

 

Alpaca: living in the PNW, alpaca farms are literally everywhere.  LITERALLY.  Alpaca is super soft, but doesn’t have good memory.  So, a sweater made of pure alpaca will tend to get longer and longer the more you wear it.  Because it doesn’t have the crimp or scales of wool, it doesn’t felt as easily as wool, but it still felts.  This lack of crimp makes it less “springy” but more drapey.  Llama is actually much like alpaca, but coarser/more durable.  Likewise, baby alpaca is softer/more fragile.

 

Cellulose:  There are a lot of cellulose fibers (plant-based) for the vegans out there. They don’t tend to be as springy as protein fibers.  This lack of “give” can be more difficult to work with and tire your hands quicker.  This also means that fewer things will come out in the blocking.

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Cotton before harvest.

Cotton probably comes to mind.  You’ll mostly want to consider if the cotton is mercerized or not.  If it’s mercerized, it won’t soak up as much water…which makes it better for garments.  If it’s not…it’s incredibly absorbent, which makes a good wash cloth.  Bamboo is a fun baby fiber because it tends to be softer than cotton right off the bat (cotton tends to need several washes to soften up).  The hidden bonus of bamboo is that it is not only machine washable, it is also naturally antimicrobial.  Linen and hemp are also available, but both take *a lot* of washing to soften up.

 

There is often a hardiness/softness tradeoff in fibers.  The trick is finding the correct balance for what your project is.  For the protein fibers (with the exception of silk…which is all sorts of different on all sorts of levels), I look at what the animal looks like.  I can see what some of the prevailing characteristics of the fiber are just by looking at it on the animal.  See how the sheep is all big and warm, and kind of felted? but the merino is sleeker and softer looking? Think about which animal you’d rather use for your project.  An outer sweater doesn’t necessarily need to be very soft, but it needs to be durable.  Whereas a neck scarf may not need to be as durable as it needs to be soft.  Again, shawls are the perfect project to play with yarn.

Before I sign off this extra long post, I wanted to talk a bit about the interplay between fiber and gauge.  We talked about how wool tends to be warmer, so it may not be a good idea to make something intended for a summer item.  But, what if we used a thinner wool? Alpaca is super drapey, but what if we wanted something a bit more sweater like? We could use a larger gauge wool, or smaller size needles to make a firmer fabric with the drapey fiber.

Do not message me about all the fibers I “forgot”.  I probably didn’t forget.  I was super clear at the beginning that this was not going to be comprehensive. On second thought…do message me.  I’ll tell you what my experience with those fibers have been.

Oh, and here’s bamboo.  Just because it breaks my brain that bamboo makes such soft yarn.  th8OB995PU

This Must Be Thursday

Size isn’t everything…right?

Friend S has wanted to do a sort of knit along.  Basically, she and I doing the same project at the same time.  A part of this, I think is so that when she comes upon something weird in the pattern, I can hopefully help.  Another part is that we live over an hour away from each other.  Even living in the future, it’s hard work to maintain friendships over that distance.  So, needs must.

I was able to cajole her into coming to a retreat at the end of last month.  (We are both making efforts) The retreat piggy-backed on OFFF (Oregon Flock and Fiber Festival).  While there, she found the pattern she wanted to work on–Waiting For Rain. Let me just interject right here how appropriate the title is since the PNW has had a dearth of rain.  I think I’m withering away. The featured image is the shawl we will be embarking on.

Eventually, I will do a post on choosing a pattern, and what to look for.  For right now, lets just assume this was done, and we are now looking at yarn for the project we’ve chosen.  The easiest thing to do, of course, is to use the yarn in the colorway the designer recommends.  You know me better than that, though, right? Each aspect of yarn can be chosen to match the pattern, or be different to the pattern (look at me being all British).

Yarn has many qualities to look at/for.  The least of which is color.  Picking a yarn (in my opinion) solely on color is like picking a car or house on the basis of color alone.  You can do it, but I will judge you–harshly. We will ignore color for now.

Gauge is generally one of first things I look into. This means how thick the yarn is…lace weight? bulky? If you like the general appearance of the piece the pattern designer has as an exemplar, you’ll want to choose a yarn of the same/similar gauge.  Please, Dear Reader, do not think you have to limit yourself to what the designer recommends.  Remember, it’s recommended to wait 20 minutes after eating before you swim…who does that?

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Called for yarn weight. Disregard guitar cable

I mean, unless you’ve eaten your weight, and might explode.  Otherwise, do whatever makes you happy.  Shawls are a perfect project to play with yarn substitution, since surprises aren’t as catastrophic in a shawl.

This particular project calls for a fingering weight yarn and size 6 needles.  I tend to knit pretty close to what most designers call for, so I’ll go with that.  I have friends who tend to knit looser, in which case, they may use a size 4 or 5 to get the same results.  Likewise, those who tend to knit tighter would go up to 7 or 8.   I could go on and on about needles and construction, but we’ll also forgo that conversation for now.

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Thinner yarn. Same guitar cable.

All else being equal, if I go with a thinner yarn, using the same needles, then the fabric I create will be looser, and airier, than the designer intended.  This may also have the effect of making a project more “drapey” than it otherwise may have been.  It may be less sturdy, and/or less warm.

If, however, I use a thicker yarn, the fabric will be denser. It will tend to be stiffer, and will impede airflow. The project could go from being a lovely spring shoulder warmer to something better suited to the wilds of northern Finland.

Please note, none of these effects are inherently good or bad, they are just different.  While you do have to be prepared for the consequences, consequences can be good things.

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Bulky yarn. Ack! the cable spawned!!

When we discuss fiber content, we will talk about some ways you can offset some of these effects, or how some of these effects will be necessary to offset the effects of the fiber you *really* want.

Now, if we use a commensurate needle–size 4 needle with a thinner yarn, or size 8 needle with a thicker yarn…then that is another way to adjust size.  The smaller needle/yarn  will make a smaller project with the same density of fabric.  The larger needle/yarn will make a larger project with the same density of fabric.  This can be a fun way to adjust sizing on a pattern which doesn’t go into the size you want.  However, if you are doing this on a garment…please, please, please gauge swatch.  There will be math.  Lots and Lots of Math. Or, you can do what I try to do, and make a garment, and trust it will find it’s own home.

Adjusting yarn thickness and needle size can affect the amount of yarn you will need as compared to what is recommended.  My personal belief is to have way more yarn than you think you need.  I recommend this to all my knitting friends.  The fact that this means I get to receive all their leftovers (seriously, 1/2 my yarn wall is hand me down partial skeins) is just a bonus.  But…if you are spending all that time and money, you don’t want to run out of yarn.

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All three sizes for comparison.

Also please note…there are *tons* more sizes of yarn than just these.  In the US, commercial yarn manufacturers have sizing charts on the ball bands.  I cannot stress enough that this is a guide only….kind of like the movie ratings.  (There are R movies that a reasonable teen can watch, but PG 13 movies I wouldn’t want them to come near)  A size 4 (worsted) can vary greatly in thickness between yarn lines, and then you have so many indie spinners and dyers who may or may not subscribe to those conventions.  Or, the dreamy yarn your friend brought from Europe….or…or…or

So as with other things in life, size matters…ish.  Within a certain range, who cares? But…get too big or too small…and well…you need to make adjustments.  Again, not better or worse, just different.